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This exhibition aims to tell the history of how we love, from original sin to the liberation of the 20th century. This love story will take us through adoration, passion, gallantry, libertinism and, of course, romanticism. It shows how, starting from a stigmatization of the feminine, each era has successively liberated women, love, relationships, pleasure, and feeling, culminating in the invention of free love. Illustrated through a collection of 250 artworks, spanning different techniques and civilizations, this history of love is by no means exhaustive, but rather emphasizes the author’s interpretation. Each of the seven chapters sheds light on a major turning point in the history of the romantic relationship. To help tell this story, punctuated with literary quotes and film clips, the exhibition will display masterpieces of ancient statuary, precious objects from the Middle Ages, paintings by Memling, Fragonard, and Delacroix, and sculptures by Canova, Rodin, and Claudel.

Photography as a weapon of class” are the words with which the journalist Henri Tracol (1909–1997) begins his manifesto on unifying the photography section of the association of revolutionary writers and artists (AEAR). The association was founded in Paris in 1932, against a background of growing political, economic and social upheaval, and brought together, alongside other sectors of the artistic and cultural domain (theatre, music, cinema, literature, painting, etc.) some of the most committed photographers of the Paris avant-garde: Jacques-André Boiffard, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Chim, André Kertész, Germaine Krull, Eli Lotar, Willy Ronis, René Zuber, and many more besides. Alongside the laypeople and workers whom they followed for their work, these photographers experimented with a language that was at the intersection of critical discourse, the militant gesture and the documentary aesthetic. They drew on Soviet and German examples while managing to carve their own path through the French social and political context.

Trisha grew up in California; now she lives and works in New York – and wherever she’s exhibiting. This is her fifth solo show with us since she first came to Air de Paris in 2002. She discovered Jean Painlevé’s films at school – like Michel Houellebecq, who was exhibiting here at the same time as the second part of our Painlevé series. The third part is vintage photos, mainly from the 1930s, of insects, small crustaceans and marine creatures, and we’re scheduling her with that.

The exhibition ON AIR is an ecosystem in becoming, hosting emergent choreographies and polyphonies across human and non-human universes, where artworks reveal the common, fragile and ephemeral rhythms and trajectories between these worlds. As a hybrid ecosystem, ON AIR is made of a myriad presences, both animate and inanimate, that meet and cohabit within it. Some voices become quiet, whilst others, perhaps those less often heard by human ears, are magnified. The exhibition functions as an ensemble for silent voices, performing the hidden scores that link events and sensibilities, earthly and cosmic phenomena – weaving a web of relations that cannot be described but maybe can be felt.   ON AIR proposes a space and time that makes manifest the forces and entities that float in the air, and their interactions with us: from CO2 to cosmic dust, from radio infrastructures to reimagined corridors of mobility. Thus, the invisible histories that compose the ecologies we are part of invite us to poetically rethink different ways of inhabiting the world – and of being human.   While extractivist activities that mine the Earth for resources continue to threaten entire ecologies, ON AIR celebrates new ways of thinking about our relation with […]

The Louvre’s Petite Galerie is a special space set aside for art and cultural education for all ages, with a selection of artworks representing different periods and techniques in yearly exhibitions—an eye-opening experience which serves as a starting point for an exploration of the whole museum. For its fourth season, the exhibition “Archaeology Goes Graphic” will spark a dialogue between archaeology and the 2018–19 guest art form—comic book art. It will invite visitors to follow in the footsteps of amateur or professional archaeologists with a passion for antiquity and see how they discover “treasures,” unearth objects buried at different periods, then classify them and try to understand what they tell us about the past. All this while illustrating how comic book art (known as the “ninth art” in France) has, in a blend of fact and fiction, drawn inspiration from the archaeological finds that have contributed to the Louvre’s collections.

2018 marks the 160th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Japan and France, as well as the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Meji period, when Japan opened up to the West. As part of the Japonisms 2018: souls in harmony cultural season, Throne will be displayed under the Pyramid of the Musée du Louvre. This monumental work by Japanese artist Kohei Nawa is entirely covered with gold leaf, and blends Japanese cultural tradition with cutting-edge technology. Nawa drew his inspiration from the shapes and origins of floats used in Eastern religious festivals. He made the work using a combination of the latest 3D modelling systems and the gold leaf gilding technique, echoing ancient Egypt and the collections of the Musée du Louvre. With this work, Nawa predicts that rapid advances in computer science and artificial intelligence could, in the long term, replace power and authority as the principal instruments of political and economic influence.

This new circuit revisits the history of the Musée National d’Art Moderne’s collections as we celebrate the bicentenary of the Musée des Artistes Vivants, of which it is one of the heirs. This “retrospective” of the museum’s collections is laid out in some fifteen sections scattered through the modern circuit. Over 120 works, accompanied by an all-new documentary system, explore the identity of the Musée National d’Art Moderne and its predecessors from the 1920s to the opening of the Centre Pompidou.

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