18 Nadcházející události

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This exhibition provides a unique insight into the design process behind a selection of groundbreaking contemporary videogames. Design work, including concept art and prototypes, feature alongside large-scale immersive installations and interactives.

Family portraits are a constant presence in modern life. Foreshadowing this, Thomas Gainsborough was the first British artist to make a regular practice of painting and drawing himself and his family members. Comprising of some of his best loved works, this exhibition will explore how these portraits not only expressed his affections but also helped advance his career. Featuring over fifty works from across the world, some of which have never been on display before, Gainsborough’s Family Album charts his career from youth to maturity, telling the story of an eighteenth-century provincial artist’s rise to metropolitan fame and fortune.

The Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2018is the leading international competition, open to all, which celebrates and promotes the very best in contemporary portrait photography from around the world.

Explore today’s home through the prism of yesterday’s imagination. Are we living in the way that pioneering architects and designers throughout the 20th century predicted, or has our idea of home proved resistant to real change?

In the first ever exhibition of his work, acclaimed British architect and urbanist, Peter Barber explores the constraints and possibilities presented by London’s current housing crisis, and the role of architecture in creating a more humane city. The exhibition will include hand-made models, drawings and large-scale photographs, as well as a selection of Barber’s sketchbooks.

Tate Modern presents the UK’s first major retrospective of the work of Anni Albers (1899–1994). This exhibition brings together her most important works from major collections in the US and Europe. Opening ahead of the centenary of the Bauhaus in 2019.

Reflecting the anxieties of the Cold War, artists used new processes and materials to make work that was often uncompromising, immediate and brutal. One critic described it as a ‘Geometry of Fear’. This exhibition in the Duveen Galleries features younger artists including Lynn Chadwick, Elizabeth Frink and Eduardo Paolozzi alongside older artists such as Jacob Epstein and Henry Moore. It also shows how the approach taken by the young British artists can be measured against the work of international artists. This includes entries to a competition to design a monument to the ‘Unknown Political Prisoner’ in 1953.

Jesse Darling’s sculptures, drawings and objects reflect the vulnerability of the human body and express the desire to resist the constraints imposed on our lives by social and political forces. The new works presented in The Ballad of Saint Jerome, revisit the story of Saint Jerome and the lion. Jerome was a fourth-century Christian scholar best known for having translated the Bible from Hebrew and Greek into Latin. According to popular legend, Jerome was confronted by a ferocious lion. Instead of reacting in fear, he recognised that the animal was injured and removed a thorn from its paw. Now tamed, the lion became his lifelong companion. The story was a familiar subject for artists in the Renaissance period, with the lion representing the taming of wild nature and Jerome representing knowledge and restraint. For Darling, the fable is about power as well as healing, raising questions about control, captivity and the subjugation of otherness. In The Ballad of Saint Jerome, Darling populates the gallery with works made from everyday objects and materials. These take on the appearance of both wounded and liberated shapes. Contorted mobility canes become animated snakes. Cabinets of curiosity try to walk away on their bent legs, and disembodied hands […]

Born in 1833, Burne-Jones rejected the industrial world of the Victorians, looking instead for inspiration from medieval art, religion, myths and legends. He made spectacular works depicting Arthurian knights, classical heroes and Biblical angels – working across painting, stained glass, embroidery, jewellery and more. With his friend William Morris he was a pioneer of the arts and crafts movement, which aimed to bring beautiful design to everyone. This exhibition – his first solo show at Tate since 1933 – charts Burne-Jones’s rise from an outsider with little formal art training to one of the most influential British artists of the late 19th century. With over 150 objects, it will bring together major works from across his career for the first time in generations. Highlights include some of his best loved works, such as his huge paintings telling the dreamlike fairytale of Sleeping Beauty, wall-filling tapestries and his remarkable drawings.

his exhibition provides a unique insight into the design process behind a selection of groundbreaking contemporary videogames. Design work, including concept art and prototypes, feature alongside large-scale immersive installations and interactives.

Tate Britain today unveils an exhibition of work by the four artists shortlisted for Turner Prize 2018: Forensic Architecture, Naeem Mohaiemen, Charlotte Prodger and Luke Willis Thompson. One of the world’s best known prizes for visual art, the Turner Prize aims to promote public debate around new developments in contemporary British art. Thanks to a new three-year partnership with BNP Paribas, free entry to the exhibition will be available for everyone aged 25 or under for the first 25 days of the show. The winner will be announced on Tuesday 4 December at an awards ceremony live on the BBC, the broadcast partner for the Turner Prize.

The acclaimed Cuban artist and activist Tania Bruguera has created a series of subtle interventions in and around Tate Modern. The work’s title is an ever-increasing figure: the number of people who migrated from one country to another last year added to the number of migrant deaths recorded so far this year – to indicate the sheer scale of mass migration and the risks involved. Bruguera has brought together a group of 21 people who live or work in the same postcode as Tate Modern. Called Tate Neighbours, they will explore how the museum can learn from and adapt to its local community. They have decided to rename Tate Modern’s Boiler­ House for a year in honour of local activist Natalie Bell. The Tate Neighbours have also written a manifesto which appears when you sign in to the free WiFi. In the Turbine Hall is a large heat-sensitive floor. By using your body heat and working together with other visitors, you can reveal a hidden portrait of Yousef, a young man who left Syria to come to London. Meanwhile, a low-frequency sound fills the space with an unsettling energy. In a small room nearby, an organic compound in the air induces tears […]

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