12 Nadcházející události

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Mike Nelson has transformed the grand spaces of the Duveen Galleries into something between a sculpture court and an asset strippers’ warehouse. He has carefully selected objects from the post-war Britain that framed his childhood – including enormous knitting machines, woodwork stripped from a former army barracks, graffitied steel awnings and doors from an NHS hospital. Nelson’s project has been informed by the Duveen Galleries’ origins as the first purpose-built sculpture galleries in England, intended to rival the sculpture court at the British Museum and the V&A’s Cast Courts. It turns the neo-classical galleries into a warehouse of monuments to a lost era and the vision of society it represented.

From his very beginnings in the late 1980s, Rudolf Stingel (*1956) has approached painting in a conceptual and self-reflexive manner, exploring its possibilities and media-specific limits through the interplay of artistic strategies, materials and shapes.

In Eliasson’s captivating installations you become aware of your senses, people around you and the world beyond. Some artworks introduce natural phenomena such as rainbows to the gallery space. Others use reflections and shadows to play with the way we perceive and interact with the world. Many works result from the artist’s research into complex geometry, motion patterns, and his interest in colour theory. All but one of the works have never been seen in the UK before. Within the exhibition will be an area which explores Eliasson’s deep engagement with society and the environment. Discover what an artist’s perspective can bring to issues of climate change, energy, migration as well as architecture. And once every other week you’ll be able to communicate with people from Eliasson’s 100-strong team in his Berlin studio via a live link. The kitchen team at Studio Olafur Eliasson will also create a special menu and programme of related events for Tate Modern’s Terrace Bar, based on the organic, vegetarian and locally sourced food served in his Berlin studio.

Over a 70-year career, Takis (Panayiotis Vassilakis, born 1925) has created some of the most innovative art of the 20th century. Takis’s work seeks out the essential poetry and beauty of the electromagnetic universe. He was one of the most original artistic voices in Europe from the 1960s and remains a pioneering figure today. This the largest exhibition of Takis’s work ever held in the UK, bringing together over 70 works. Throughout his career he has produced antennae-like sculptures he calls Signals, and musical devices using magnets, electricity and viewer participation to generate resonant and random sounds. Such inventions earned Takis the admiration of the international avant-garde, ranging from the American Beat poets to artists such as Marcel Duchamp.

The BP Portrait Award is the most prestigious portrait painting competition in the world and represents the very best in contemporary portrait painting. With a first prize of £35,000, and a total prize fund of £74,000, the Award is aimed at encouraging artists to focus upon and develop portraiture in their work. Over the years, this has attracted over 40,000 entries from more than 100 countries.

Tate Liverpool presents a new commission by Berlin-based artist Sol Calero (born in Caracas, Venezuela, 1982). Calero’s work takes the form of brightly coloured, large-scale immersive installations that explore themes of representation, identity, displacement and marginalisation, all informed by her own perspective as a migrant. Calero’s new commission, El Autobús 2019, is inspired by a recent journey through Latin America. Visitors are invited to travel through the Wolfson Gallery, exploring the floor-to-ceiling mural which overwhelms the space with a landscape of patterns, panoramic views, floral motifs and architectural elements. Rooted in the centre of the gallery is a bus-like structure, which is reminiscent of the buses used by locals in Latin America. Visitors are encouraged to jump aboard to continue their own journey through the exhibition. Listen out for bus announcements, which promise to take you to destinations that can never be reached.

A part of the legendary New York art scene of the 1980s, Keith Haring (1958–1990) was inspired by graffiti, pop art and underground club culture. Haring was a great collaborator and worked with like-minded artists such as Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat. All were interested in creating art for the many. Haring designed record covers for RUN DMC and David Bowie, directed a music video for Grace Jones and developed a fashion line with Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood. In doing so, he introduced his art and ideas to as many people as possible. Discover how activism played a key role in Haring’s art. Compelled to speak for his generation, his art responds to urgent issues including political dictatorship, racism, homophobia, drug addiction, AIDS awareness, capitalism and the environment. Visitors to the exhibition will see more than 85 artworks including large, vibrant paintings and drawings. Also on display are posters, photographs, and videos that capture the vibrancy of 1980s New York street culture.

From gastronomic experiments to urban farming, this exhibition brings together the politics and pleasure of food to ask how the collective choices we make can lead to a more sustainable, just and delicious food future.

From miniskirts and hot pants to vibrant tights and makeup, discover how Mary Quant launched a fashion revolution on the British high street, with over 200 garments and accessories, including unseen pieces from the designer’s personal archive.

This display marks the bicentenary of the birth of George Eliot (1819–80), one of Britain’s most renowned novelists. Born Mary Anne Evans on 22 November 1819, she embarked on her career at the relatively mature age of thirty-two, initially working for the radical London periodical, the Westminster Review. In 1859, her first novel, Adam Bede, was published to critical acclaim and she went on to write six further titles, including The Mill on the Floss(1860) and Middlemarch (1871–2), celebrated for their realism and insights into the messy complexity of human relationships. Evans adopted the pseudonym ‘George Eliot’ to retain her anonymity. Since 1853, she had been romantically involved with a married man, the writer George Henry Lewes; although separated from his wife, their relationship was regarded as improper. Eliot also had concerns about her physical appearance, as her face had been described as ‘long’, ‘pale’ and horse-like. A pen-name could avoid drawing attention to both her awkward social position and unconventional looks, and allow her novels to be judged on their own merits. Eliot’s efforts to keep a low public profile extended to the visual image, this display’s central theme. At a time when the trade in popular portraits of celebrities was flourishing, she was […]

William Shakespeare’s history plays have shaped perceptions of the Plantagenet kings for centuries, with a cast of characters ranging from the flawed Richard II to the heroic Henry V. The plays were not created in isolation, but drew extensively on the historical accounts that were published in the sixteenth century to justify and celebrate the position of the Tudor dynasty, fuelling an interest in English history that also encouraged the production of posthumous portraits. This small display examines the Tudor construction of Plantagenet portraits and their legacy in the popular imagination.

Designer Maker User is an introduction to the museum’s collection, looking at the development of modern design through these three interconnected roles.

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