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The exhibition title takes its name from bible verse Jeremiah 29:11 to echo the central role of the Black church in bringing communities together, inspiring hope, and acting as a vector for social change. The goal of this exhibition is to offer a space of learning and meditation that highlights the Black history of Montgomery County and western Washington, DC and pay homage to the communities who championed fights against racial discrimination through faith, family, and fellowship. While this exhibition highlights the communities of Scotland, Tobytown, and Macedonia-Moses, we hope future iterations of Plans to Prosper You will continue to prompt in-depth collaboration within and beyond these communities.

There is a mystery in the act of burying and even more so in uncovering. Maia Cruz Palileo’s paintings and drawings are the metaphorical teeth in this body of work spanning from 2013 to 2019. These works, including a small painting titled Burying Teeth, depict historical narratives from the colonial past of the Philippines, Maia’s country of origin, as well as stories and moments about her own life as a Filipina American growing up in the United States. Her paintings and drawings replicate figures from old family photographs, as well as photos from the American government’s archives depicting anthropological documentation of Filipinos during the American colonization. While her work evokes nostalgia and romanticism, it is imbued with a critical undertone of America’s colonization of the Philippines. Maia’s work is an examination of the Filipino diasporic psyche through a personal and political lens.

Being Here as ME presents six women artists striving towards constructions of female subjectivity. Pey-Chwen Lin, Tzu-Ning Wu, Yung-Chieh Wu, I-Chun Chen, Pei-Shih Tu, and Hui-Chan Kuo create new media artworks through diverse mediums and methods. Their work transcends gender discussions, and through social strategies, action, and engagement they express their concerns and create artworks revealing their anxiety and opinions about the ecology of society, science, technology and the environment. This exhibition is sponsored by the Ministry of Culture, Republic of China (Taiwan) and Taiwan Academy, Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office in the US (TECRO).

Passages: Keith Morrison, 1999-2019 surveys thirty paintings and watercolors by the Jamaican-born Keith Morrison. A magician of color and space and a teller of tales, fanciful and real, Morrison focuses on the tangible and spiritual components of culture. His subjects encompass Afro-Caribbean and Meso-American art and architecture, as well as the somber history of the Middle Passage. By turns mystical, meditative and joyous, Morrison’s work invites our entry into the rich visual world of his making.

In the more than hundred drawings and prints on display, the autobiographically seen, remembered and imagined merge with pata- and metaphysical speculations to form a unique visionary travel. Whether the viewer encounters monkeys that observe the world of humans as anthropologists or lizards that are prone to alcoholism – the perspectives twist and turn while absurd humour, carnavalesque puns and surreal exaggerations not only reveal the artistic but also the subversive value of Mattia Denisse’s fantasies.

In collaboration with the HipHopHuis and guest curator Lee Stuart, the Kunsthal Rotterdam presents an exhibition about hip-hop and its influence on fashion and lifestyle. Streetwear is dictating the speed and aesthetics of the fashion industry and changing how that industry is developing itself. Hip-hop is THE youth culture of choice, dominating the charts as well as the world-wide street scene – from a source of inspiration for high fashion brands to making sportswear more accepted for everyday attire.

Tate Liverpool presents a new commission by Berlin-based artist Sol Calero (born in Caracas, Venezuela, 1982). Calero’s work takes the form of brightly coloured, large-scale immersive installations that explore themes of representation, identity, displacement and marginalisation, all informed by her own perspective as a migrant. Calero’s new commission, El Autobús 2019, is inspired by a recent journey through Latin America. Visitors are invited to travel through the Wolfson Gallery, exploring the floor-to-ceiling mural which overwhelms the space with a landscape of patterns, panoramic views, floral motifs and architectural elements. Rooted in the centre of the gallery is a bus-like structure, which is reminiscent of the buses used by locals in Latin America. Visitors are encouraged to jump aboard to continue their own journey through the exhibition. Listen out for bus announcements, which promise to take you to destinations that can never be reached.

A part of the legendary New York art scene of the 1980s, Keith Haring (1958–1990) was inspired by graffiti, pop art and underground club culture. Haring was a great collaborator and worked with like-minded artists such as Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat. All were interested in creating art for the many. Haring designed record covers for RUN DMC and David Bowie, directed a music video for Grace Jones and developed a fashion line with Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood. In doing so, he introduced his art and ideas to as many people as possible. Discover how activism played a key role in Haring’s art. Compelled to speak for his generation, his art responds to urgent issues including political dictatorship, racism, homophobia, drug addiction, AIDS awareness, capitalism and the environment. Visitors to the exhibition will see more than 85 artworks including large, vibrant paintings and drawings. Also on display are posters, photographs, and videos that capture the vibrancy of 1980s New York street culture.

Projekt představuje nastupující generaci umělců střední Evropy z Maďarska, Slovenska a Česka.  

With more than twenty million inhabitants in its Metropolitan area, São Paulo is a South American megacity with complex problems like extreme traffic, air pollution, water shortage, and informal settlements.  At the same time, the city has invested in architectural infrastructures for decades, creating inclusive places for urban society. The exhibition presents these buildings and projects, showing their possibilities and potentials. The selected examples have been built from the 1960s to the present, and range from a canopy in a public park to large multifunctional buildings. The most ambitious examples have collective programs that include sports, culture, health and gastronomical facilities. What all the selected projects share is their ability to create places of cooperation far beyond their functionality.

The BP Portrait Award is the most prestigious portrait painting competition in the world and represents the very best in contemporary portrait painting. With a first prize of £35,000, and a total prize fund of £74,000, the Award is aimed at encouraging artists to focus upon and develop portraiture in their work. Over the years, this has attracted over 40,000 entries from more than 100 countries.