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How is nature presented in contemporary art? And how are humans interpreted as relating to other species? The Coexistence exhibition opening in April 2019 looks at the relationship between humans and nature. Environmental issues, nature, and human coexistence with other organisms are topics of long-standing interest in art, but they have recently come into sharper focus amid the eco-crisis of the 2000s.

With The Black Image Corporation, Theaster Gates has conceived a participatory exhibition which explores the fundamental legacy of Johnson Publishing Company archives. Featuring more than four million images, they have contributed to shape the aesthetic and cultural languages of African American identity. Central to the exhibition are the works of two photographers, Moneta Sleet Jr. and Isaac Sutton, who both worked for Johnson Publishing.

The Moscow Museum of Modern Art with the support of the Italian Embassy in Moscow and the Italian Cultural Institute presents a retrospective exhibition by Mikhail Kulakov (1933–2015) titled «The Style of the Thaw Period». The exhibition includes works from Mikhail Kulakov’s workshop in Italy, the State Russian Museum, the Tretyakov Gallery, as well as from private collections in St. Petersburg and Moscow. As a result of the cultural cooperation between Russia and Italy, the exhibition is a continuation of MMOMA’s program dedicated to introducing Moscow audiences to prominent Russian artists. The general partner of the project is the Generali Group, the largest insurance company in Italy.

On the occasion of the symbolic loan by Romania of King Stephen the Great’s “Battle flag of Saint Georges,” this exhibition seeks to highlight the exceptional character of Romanian collections of embroidery of Byzantine tradition, jewel of both Romanian and universal heritage. Around the masterpiece that Stephen the Great (1457–1504) offered to the Zograf Monastery on Mount Athos, which was solemnly handed over by France to the Romanian state in 1917, a number of extraordinary works will illustrate the remarkable development of embroidery of Byzantine tradition in Romania from the mid-15th to the mid-17th centuries. Inherited from Byzantium, the embroidered ornamentation of the “sacerdotal vestments” of bishops, priests and deacons, and that of the “liturgical vestments” intended for worship will be exhibited alongside an unrivalled collection of royal tombstone covers, upon which the hieratic character of Byzantine images was ultimately supplanted by the appeal of portraiture.

The central theme of the new setting-up of the architecture collections is the evolution that the concept of inhabiting has been undergoing since the aftermath of the Second World War, analysed through the works of the great masters of the 20 th century and the new emerging figures in the landscape of international architecture. The setting-up of the exhibition is based on the overlapping of various paths and links the various scales of the act of inhabiting, from the individual to the collective, with specific reference to the more complex and hybrid experiences that bear witness to the new relationships between individuals and communities. The constant dialogue between masters and young architects, made possible by their works, provides a further interpretation.

This exhibition presents an extraordinary chronicler of the Italy of the Fifties and Sixties who published more than 500 photographs in the weekly Il Mondo, portraying created by the famous journalist Mario Pannunzio, protagonists of the worlds of art, culture, fashion and film along with ordinary people.

What a shock it must have been for Hendrick ter Brugghen, Gerard van Honthorst, and Dirck van Baburen, three young painters from Utrecht, when they encountered the breathtaking and unorthodox paintings of Caravaggio for the first time in Rome. Described as ‘miraculous things’, his works were marked by an innovative realism, striking drama, and mysterious lighting. He would shape the style of many artists from Italy, France, Spain, and the Netherlands. The exhibition, developed in collaboration with the Centraal Museum in Utrecht, shows over 70 of the most beautiful and important works of the leading ‘Caravaggisti’, including paintings by Bartolomeo Manfredi, Jusepe de Ribera, and Valentin de Boulogne. Placed alongside the works of their painterly colleagues, it becomes immediately apparent why the significant pictures of these Utrecht painters are so typically Dutch and had success both in Italy as well as at home.