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This exhibition explores the complexity of Israel and the West Bank—their topography, inhabitants, and everyday life—from the perspective of twelve internationally acclaimed photographers. Photographer and project initiator Frédéric Brenner says that his point of departure for the project was the desire to add new artistic visions to the images familiar from reporting on the region. He convinced renowned photographers to join him: Wendy Ewald, Martin Kollar, Josef Koudelka, Jungjin Lee, Gilles Peress, Fazal Sheikh, Stephen Shore, Rosalind Fox Solomon, Thomas Struth, Jeff Wall, and Nick Waplington.

Edith Dekyndt (b. 1960 in Ypres, Belgium) lives and works in Tournai and Berlin. Her works have been shown at venues including the BOZAR and the Wiels in Brussels, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the Witte de With in Rotterdam. Dekyndt was awarded the Kunstpreis 2010.

The first-ever artist-curated exhibition mounted at the Guggenheim celebrates the museum’s extensive collection of modern and contemporary art. Curated by Cai Guo-Qiang, Paul Chan, Jenny Holzer, Julie Mehretu, Richard Prince, and Carrie Mae Weems – artists who each have had influential solo shows at the museum – Artistic License brings together both well-known and rarely seen works from the turn of the century to 1980.

From a one-man business to a global enterprise: We reflect on 200 years of furniture design as illustrated by the history of family company Thonet. The groundbreaking achievements of the early period – new technologies, new design methods, new distribution and marketing channels – are juxtaposed to developments in the 20th and early 21st century. The firm founded in 1819 by Michael Thonet, a master cabinet-maker from Boppart, evolved down through the decades into one of the most important makers of bentwood furniture. Its “No. 14” continues to be one of the most popular chairs to this day and is still produced in large numbers. In the late 1920s, Thonet turned its attention to tubular steel furniture and teamed up with several Bauhaus designers who created chairs in what was then an innovative technology. As these tubular steel furniture items and the early bentwood furniture have long been part of the permanent exhibition at Die Neue Sammlung, the focus of the current presentation is on the pioneering creations by modern designers from Eddie Harlis via Verner Panton through to Norman Foster, Stefan Diez, Konstantin Grcic and – most recently – Sebastian Herkner. For the design of the exhibition we were […]

The concept of pendulums – be they suspended lamps or swinging metal ellipsoids – is a central feature of Ingo Maurer’s oeuvre that enables him to mobilize light using simple means. Since time immemorial people have been fascinated by the archaic shape of the egg and its perfect design. The swinging pendulum is one of nature’s physical phenomena that already provided orientation to the Ancient Egyptians. Watching a pendulum is one of the kinetic experiences with a positive impact on our well-being thanks to its regular and calming motion. It is this combination of the egg’s harmonious shape and the comforting quality of the “Pendulum” that informed Ingo Maurer’s pendulum – it offers us a new spatial experience whether it is in motion or not.

How is nature presented in contemporary art? And how are humans interpreted as relating to other species? The Coexistence exhibition opening in April 2019 looks at the relationship between humans and nature. Environmental issues, nature, and human coexistence with other organisms are topics of long-standing interest in art, but they have recently come into sharper focus amid the eco-crisis of the 2000s.

At the People and Plants exhibition you’ll find out why the plant world is not only literally vital to our survival, but also delightful in its sheer diversity and beauty. The architecture for the exhibition has been designed to grow like a flower into the three rooms, with its roots, leaves and blossoms. Within this setting, an array of cultural-historical records and artworks, scientific specimens, photographs and video installations vividly demonstrate just how much curiosity and affection we as human beings have for our plant-based environment – but also how reckless and destructive we have been towards it.

The central theme of the new setting-up of the architecture collections is the evolution that the concept of inhabiting has been undergoing since the aftermath of the Second World War, analysed through the works of the great masters of the 20 th century and the new emerging figures in the landscape of international architecture. The setting-up of the exhibition is based on the overlapping of various paths and links the various scales of the act of inhabiting, from the individual to the collective, with specific reference to the more complex and hybrid experiences that bear witness to the new relationships between individuals and communities. The constant dialogue between masters and young architects, made possible by their works, provides a further interpretation.

Since last year, this gallery space of Witte de With has been used as a site for displays and events. It also functions as bookshop and classroom. These developments on site developed in connection with an initiative on collective learning, which, among other things, entails a work/study program designed for Rotterdam youth. The first edition of this program took place from September 2018 to February 2019. It involved nine participants, and it thematically centered on identity issues, hospitality and entrepreneurship. As part of the program, the participants were tasked to propose a new identity for the space. They proposed naming it MELLY, towards creating a more welcoming environment and conversation-based program.

An Exhibition of Posters by Maja Bekan, Kévin Bray, Chloë Delanghe, Baldvin Einarsson, Priscila Fernandes, Vera Gulikers, An Onghena, Kevin Osepa, Josie Perry, Rory Pilgrim, Tramaine de Senna and Edward Clydesdale Thomson.