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For more than four decades Ann and Jürgen Wilde have been compiling their unique collection of modern and contemporary photography, which has been affiliated with the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen since 2010, as the Ann and Jürgen Wilde Foundation. Works by photographers like Aenne Biermann, Florence Henri, and Germaine Krull lie at the collection’s core. The program at Galerie Wilde (1972–1985), which was the only gallery in Germany to specialize in photography at the time of its founding, was also innovative for including female photographers, among them Jan Groover, Marcia Resnick, Gwenn Thomas, and Deborah Turbeville. To this day, Ann Wilde remains particularly interested in promoting and acquiring work made by female artists and photographers. On the occasion of her birthday, the donor is opening her private collection to the public for the first time. Re-visions presents photographs that speak to Ann Wilde personally: work from the 1920s up to the present, made by artists like Johanna Diehl, Rineke Dijkstra, Marie Jo Lafontaine, Barbara Probst, Alexandra Ranner, Judith Joy Ross, Martina Sauter, Eva-Maria Schön, Kathrin Sonntag, and Heidi Specker.

The sounds design objects make are often just as characteristic as their design. And so from 21 February, 2019 visitors will able to listen to the sounds of various exhibition items from our collection thanks to the web-app Sound of Design. Using mobile devices or their home computers they will be able to delve into the world of design noises. Sounds range from historical telephones via the engine noises of iconic cars through to the clacking of a keyboard. We are adding sounds to our collection so as to integrate this acoustic dimension of our exhibition items into our presentation – above all with a view to the planned display area. By publishing this archive in our Web-app it will form part of the multimedia experience visitors can enjoy while also infusing life into objects that might otherwise seem remote museum pieces. By way of introducing Sound of Design we are launching a topical focus on the era of the German economic miracle (1950s/1960s), in which new electrical devices and with them diverse sounds entered people’s everyday lives.

Following the acquisition in 2018 of ‘Grodenstraße nach Varelerhafen’ (Polder Road to Varel Harbour), dating from 1938, the Sammlung Moderne Kunst is staging an exhibition on Franz Radziwill, one of the most important representatives of Magic Realism. The focus is on his Expressionist early work as a continuation of the ‘Brücke’, as well as on his involvement with the Nazi regime – between conformity and defamation as a ‘degenerate’ artist. One of Radziwill’s canvases, painted on both the front and back, is being exhibited for the first time showing both sides, to highlight the break between an Expressionist early work and a principal work of Magic Realism.

To mark the 100th anniversary of Bauhaus, Die Neue Sammlung is having an exhibition that discusses the significance of this pioneering reform design college today. Simultaneously, Die Neue Sammlung is taking the opportunity to highlight its own historical links to Bauhaus. For the first time the museum will showcase historical objects from its own holdings in Munich. In cooperation with the artist Tilo Schulz an installation is realized interlocking 40 historical objects and responses to them by five contemporary artists. Invitations have been taken up by designer Ayzit Bostan, poet Barbara Köhler, architect Anupama Kundoo, composer Junya Oikawa, and artist Sofie Thorsen to explore one Bauhaus object and develop an independent work of their own.

This display marks the bicentenary of the birth of George Eliot (1819–80), one of Britain’s most renowned novelists. Born Mary Anne Evans on 22 November 1819, she embarked on her career at the relatively mature age of thirty-two, initially working for the radical London periodical, the Westminster Review. In 1859, her first novel, Adam Bede, was published to critical acclaim and she went on to write six further titles, including The Mill on the Floss(1860) and Middlemarch (1871–2), celebrated for their realism and insights into the messy complexity of human relationships. Evans adopted the pseudonym ‘George Eliot’ to retain her anonymity. Since 1853, she had been romantically involved with a married man, the writer George Henry Lewes; although separated from his wife, their relationship was regarded as improper. Eliot also had concerns about her physical appearance, as her face had been described as ‘long’, ‘pale’ and horse-like. A pen-name could avoid drawing attention to both her awkward social position and unconventional looks, and allow her novels to be judged on their own merits. Eliot’s efforts to keep a low public profile extended to the visual image, this display’s central theme. At a time when the trade in popular portraits of celebrities was flourishing, she was […]

A tour-de-force multi-screen film installation, Manifesto draws on the somewhat anachronistic literary form of manifestos – declarations of belief usually combined with a call for action. Artist Julian Rosefeldt revisited dozens of 20th-century manifestos, examining their relevance and power today and blending foundational texts of art movements including Dada, Surrealism, and Futurism to create thirteen new texts written as monologues. Sole actor Cate Blanchett performs the monologues as different characters in diverse settings (…).

The Albertina houses one of Europe’s most important compilations of Modernist art in the form of the Batliner Collection. Its permanent display starts off with such artists of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism as Monet, Degas, Cézanne, Toulouse-Lautrec, and Gauguin. Further highlights include examples of German Expressionism, with the groups of Brücke and Der Blaue Reiter, and the art of New Objectivity, with works by Wacker, Sedlacek, and Hofer. An in-depth focus on Austrian art comprises works by Kokoschka and paintings by Egger-Lienz. The great diversity of the Russian avant-garde is represented by paintings by Goncharova, Malevich, and Chagall. The presentation is topped off by numerous chefs-d’oeuvre by Picasso, ranging from his early Cubist pictures and works from his mature period of the 1940s to superb prints that have not yet been exhibited and paintings from his experimental late period.

The collection of the Alte Pinakothek, one of the most significant in the world, encompasses over 700 artworks from the 14th to the 18th centuries. Here, milestones of the European painting tradition join to form a survey, in unique concentration, that spans the development from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance and Baroque, through to the late Rococo period. Experience encounters with works by Dürer, Raphael, Leonardo, Titian, El Greco, Rubens, Rembrandt, Boucher and their contemporaries. The museum, contracted by the Bavarian King Ludwig I, was built by Leo von Klenze between 1826 and 1836 in the Neoclassical style, which at the time represented a new and pioneering effort in European museum architecture. Originally, the Alte Pinakothek was intended to make sufficient space available for the art collection of the House of Wittelsbach. Over and above this, King Ludwig I sought to use the construction of the Alte Pinakothek as a means of providing the general public access to his collection. In addition to the permanent presentation of outstanding works from the golden ages of German, Flemish, Dutch, French, Italian and Spanish painting, a host of temporary special exhibitions, guided tours and events make a visit worthwhile.

Designer Maker User is an introduction to the museum’s collection, looking at the development of modern design through these three interconnected roles.

Gustav Klimt created the famous Beethoven Frieze for the XIVth exhibition of the Association of Visual Artists Vienna Secession, which was held between April 15 and June 27, 1902. Conceived as a tribute to the composer Ludwig van Beethoven, the presentation epitomized the Secessionists’ vision of an encompassing synthesis of the arts. Twenty-one artists worked together under the direction of Josef Hoffmann. At the center of the exhibition, in the main hall, stood Max Klinger’s Beethoven statue. In addition to Klimt’s Beethoven Frieze, the show featured wall paintings and decorations by Alfred Roller, Adolf Böhm, Ferdinand Andri and numerous other artists. The stated objective was to reunite the separate arts—architecture, painting, sculpture and music—under a common theme: the “work of art” was to emerge from the interplay of the design of the rooms and the wall paintings and sculptures. Klimt’s monumental wall cycle was located in the left-hand aisle, which visitors to the exhibition entered first. An opening in the wall offered a view of Max Klinger’s Beethoven statue, hinting at the intended synergy of architecture, painting (Klimt’s Beethoven Frieze) and sculpture (Klinger’s Beethoven). With nearly 60,000 visitors, the XIVth exhibition was one of the Secession’s greatest public successes. It also proved crucial to Klimt’s […]

William Shakespeare’s history plays have shaped perceptions of the Plantagenet kings for centuries, with a cast of characters ranging from the flawed Richard II to the heroic Henry V. The plays were not created in isolation, but drew extensively on the historical accounts that were published in the sixteenth century to justify and celebrate the position of the Tudor dynasty, fuelling an interest in English history that also encouraged the production of posthumous portraits. This small display examines the Tudor construction of Plantagenet portraits and their legacy in the popular imagination.