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How is nature presented in contemporary art? And how are humans interpreted as relating to other species? The Coexistence exhibition opening in April 2019 looks at the relationship between humans and nature. Environmental issues, nature, and human coexistence with other organisms are topics of long-standing interest in art, but they have recently come into sharper focus amid the eco-crisis of the 2000s.

At the People and Plants exhibition you’ll find out why the plant world is not only literally vital to our survival, but also delightful in its sheer diversity and beauty. The architecture for the exhibition has been designed to grow like a flower into the three rooms, with its roots, leaves and blossoms. Within this setting, an array of cultural-historical records and artworks, scientific specimens, photographs and video installations vividly demonstrate just how much curiosity and affection we as human beings have for our plant-based environment – but also how reckless and destructive we have been towards it.

The central theme of the new setting-up of the architecture collections is the evolution that the concept of inhabiting has been undergoing since the aftermath of the Second World War, analysed through the works of the great masters of the 20 th century and the new emerging figures in the landscape of international architecture. The setting-up of the exhibition is based on the overlapping of various paths and links the various scales of the act of inhabiting, from the individual to the collective, with specific reference to the more complex and hybrid experiences that bear witness to the new relationships between individuals and communities. The constant dialogue between masters and young architects, made possible by their works, provides a further interpretation.

This exhibition will be the first for over a decade in Spain devoted to the Swiss-American artist Christian Marclay, who currently lives and works in London, and will include a selection focusing on his sonic compositions, from graphic scores to video installations.

Porcelain is like a material memory that can endure for centuries. UIi Aigner uses this medium as a starting-point to transform loss into a material message about life and survival. Her monumental porcelain vessel is to be shown in the series Carlone Contemporary in which contemporary artworks are juxtaposed with the Baroque pictorial programme of the Carlone Hall.

Weltmuseum Wien presents the most extensive exhibition of modern and contemporary art from Nepal to date. The works on display range from outstanding representatives of the 1950s through to today’s nascent scene of vibrant new artists. As well contributing to an effective resituating of the West’s status within an international context, these works also offer insights into how the local, the national and the global interplay.

The Weltmuseum Wien is showing the largest-ever exhibition showcasing modern and contemporary art from Nepal. The works on display range from outstanding representatives of the 1950s through to today’s nascent scene of vibrant new artists. As well contributing to an effective resituating of the West’s status within an international context, these works also offer insights into how the local, the national and the global interplay.

This exhibition project will recreate the original aspect of Room 39, known as Their Majesties’ Retiring Room. First opened in 1828, it was intended as a portrait gallery of the Bourbon Dynasty. The images on display were accompanied by still lifes, floral compositions and landscapes and by other paintings that depict events from the reigns of Charles III and Ferdinand VII. This installation will recreate the hanging of the paintings at different heights and will include some of the furnishings made for this space, including Ferdinand VII’s toilet.

An Exhibition of Posters by Maja Bekan, Kévin Bray, Chloë Delanghe, Baldvin Einarsson, Priscila Fernandes, Vera Gulikers, An Onghena, Kevin Osepa, Josie Perry, Rory Pilgrim, Tramaine de Senna and Edward Clydesdale Thomson.

From miniskirts and hot pants to vibrant tights and makeup, discover how Mary Quant launched a fashion revolution on the British high street, with over 200 garments and accessories, including unseen pieces from the designer’s personal archive.

The exhibition features slides, colour photos, vintage prints, correspondence and proofs, documents recounting the complexity of the creative process. In particular, the exhibition investigates the relationship between the photography of Elisabetta Catalano and performance art, presenting portraits of a number of artists including Joseph Beuys, Fabio Mauri, Vettor Pisani and Cesare Tacchi during the preparatory phases of the performative process.