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Lee Mingwei’s artistic practice is primarily concerned with rituals of giving and receiving. From 27 March to 7 June 2020, the Gropius Bau will present a solo exhibition by the artist, showing his installations and performances from the last three decades. Central to the exhibition is an exploration of art’s potential to be a transformative gift.

Artists: Auguste Rodin, Rebecca Horn, Jan Cossiers, Caspar David Friedrich, Anselm Kiefer, Francisco de Goya, Jorinde Voigt, Tino Sehgal, Guido van der Werve, A. Erkmen, Idris Khan, J.M.W. Turner, John Baldessari

Over the past five decades, the US-American artist Barbara Kasten (b. 1936, lives and works in Chicago), who can be described as an artist’s artist, has created an impressive oeuvre, at the core of which are her abstract photographs.

The presentation focuses on five artists: Edgar Degas (1834–1917), Auguste Rodin (1840–1917), Medardo Rosso (1858–1928), Paolo Troubetzkoy (1866–1936) and Rembrandt Bugatti (1884–1916). With their works, they are representative for the fundamental question of the existence of an Impressionist style of sculpture and, at the same time, serve as prototypes for a cross-media artistic work in painting and sculpture.

In 1551, Prince Philip of Spain, the future King Philip II, commissioned Titian, the most famous painter in Europe, to produce a group of paintings showing Classical myths primarily taken from the Roman poet Ovid’s ‘Metamorphoses’. The exhibition reunites all six paintings in the series, from Boston, Madrid, and London, for the first time in over four centuries. Included are ‘Diana and Actaeon’ and ‘Diana and Callisto’; works we own jointly with the National Galleries of Scotland.

This major retrospective is the first Warhol exhibition at Tate Modern for almost 20 years. As well as his iconic pop images of Marilyn Monroe, Coca-Cola and Campbell’s soup cans, it includes works never seen before in the UK. Twenty-five works from his Ladies and Gentlemen series – portraits of black and Latinx drag queens and trans women – are shown for the first time in 30 years. Visitors can also play with his floating Silver Clouds and experience the psychedelic multimedia environment of the Exploding Plastic Inevitable.

The artists in the exhibition offer a critique of the harsh processes that are undermining emancipatory political values which try to provide a dignified life for the many. Equally important, the presented artists suggest that the former horizon of a good life could become something else, replaced by ideas drawn from degrowth, feminism, ecology and decolonial thinking.

Tate Britain’s major new exhibition celebrates the brief but astonishing career of Aubrey Beardsley. Although he died tragically young at the age of just 25, Beardsley’s strange, sinuous black-and-white images have continued to shock and delight for over a century. Bringing together 200 spectacular works, this is the largest display of his original drawings in over 50 years and the first exhibition of his work at Tate since 1923.

Aubrey Beardsley shocked and delighted late-Victorian London with his sinuous black and white drawings. He explored the erotic and the elegant, the humorous and grotesque, winning admirers around the world with his distinctive style.

The exhibition Women War Photographers – From Lee Miller to Anja Niedringhaus is devoted to photojournalistic coverage of international wars and conflicts. On display are some 140 images shot between 1936 and 2011 by a number of women photojournalists and documentary photographers: Carolyn Cole (*1961), Françoise Demulder (1947–2008), Catherine Leroy (1944–2006), Susan Meiselas (*1948), Lee Miller (1907–1977), Anja Niedringhaus (1965–2014), Christine Spengler (*1945) and Gerda Taro (1910–1937).

This exhibition will present the kimono as a dynamic and constantly evolving icon of fashion, revealing the sartorial, aesthetic and social significance of the garment from the 1660s to the present day, both in Japan and the rest of the world.