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The 1990s: Think raves, when sportswear hits high fashion and unisex styles became popular, when political activism grew in the wake of the global AIDS crisis, and the end of the Cold War signaled the reorganization of the world, think of the reunification of Germany, and how the mass-production and use of mobile phones came into being, as well as the prevalent spread of the Internet. Yet the nineties also appear to mark a point in history where the time horizon curves and the future and the past seem set in some kind of loop. From then on, there is seemingly nothing culturally significant that hasn’t existed before, albeit in slightly different guises.

“Who am I? How do others see me? Who do I want to be?” Especially during puberty, the question of one’s own identity gains in importance. For the first time, the Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg is enabling young people to conceive their own exhibition on this theme. The museum’s curatorial and research assistants have developed an exhibition program together with young people between the ages of fourteen and seventeen.

In recent years, Rachel Rose has quickly risen to prominence for her compelling video installations and films. In her work, the artist often explores how our relationship to landscape, storytelling and belief systems around mortality are inseparably linked to one other. Through multiple subject matter — whether investigating the use of cryonics to extend life after death, narratives of abandonment in children’s literature, or the sensory experience of zero gravity in outer space — she questions what it is that makes us human and how we seek to alter and escape that designation.

Altan’s entire world told through original drawings, posters, illustrations, paintings, sketches, tables, books and videos.

The exhibition focuses on the creation of the “legend of Van Gogh” around 1900 as well as his significance to modern art in Germany. It unites more than 120 paintings and works on paper. At the heart of the exhibition are 50 key works by Vincent van Gogh from all phases of his artistic work. It is the most comprehensive presentation in Germany to include works by the painter for nearly 20 years.

The exhibition will reveal the artistic personality of two of the most outstanding women artists in western art. Through a total of 60 works and for the first time, the Museo del Prado will jointly present the most important paintings by Sofonisba Anguissola (ca.1535-1625) and Lavinia Fontana (1552-1614). The two artists achieved recognition and fame among their contemporaries for and despite their status as female painters. Both were able to break away from the prevailing stereotypes assigned to women in relation to artistic practice and the deep-rooted scepticism regarding women’s creative and artistic abilities.

From Where I Stand is the first UK museum show of artist Otobong Nkanga, whose practice spans tapestry, drawing, photography, installation, video and performance. The exhibition explores the politics of land and its relationship to the body, and histories of land acquisition and ownership. It will feature new works created especially for the Tate St Ives exhibition, including a wall painting and sculpture, alongside well known works such as The Weight of Scars 2015, Tsumeb Fragments 2015, and From Where I Stand 2015, as well as several paintings and photographs which will be shown publicly for the first time.

The exhibition ‘Forever Rotterdam’ shows images of post-war life in the Port of Rotterdam, shot by the photographer Daniël van de Ven (Rotterdam, 1929). As a photojournalist, Van de Ven captured many important moments during the years between 1947 and 1971, often commissioned by the Holland America Line. From the war brides travelling to Canada to join their lovers after the liberation in 1945, to the construction of the s.s. Rotterdam (1956-1959). Also shown are photographs of departing migrants, who were in search of a better life on the other side of the world, as well as the arrival and departure of many visitors to Rotterdam. Through Van de Ven’s lens, the twentieth-century Port of Rotterdam comes to life.

A cinematographic animation project that starts on paper to transform into a collective and participatory art performance.

Posenenske’s works can be described as oscillating between Minimalism and Conceptualism, participatory art and performance, social practice and institutional criticism. The exhibition brings together her first drawings and paintings (her earliest experiments with mark making), aluminium wall-reliefs, and her last and best-known modular sculptures.