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Exhibition will show works by Edward Hopper (1882–1967), one of the 20th century’s most important American painters. Hopper was born in Nyack, New York. After training as an illustrator, he studied painting at the New York School of Art until 1906. Next to German, French and Russian literature, the young artist found key reference points in painters such as Diego Velázquez, Francisco de Goya, Gustave Courbet and Édouard Manet.

This exhibition comprises many works that could be thought of as conventional portraits of individuals in a wide range of media, including woodblock and wood engravings, intaglio prints, mezzotints, monoprints, photography, collage, and an assemblage made with found objects. The show also pushes the boundaries of portraiture by including works that capture the likenesses of animals, places, memories, and events.

Robert Franklin Gates: Paint What You See showcases an adventurous artist who greatly influenced the course of Washington art from his arrival from Detroit in 1930, at the age of 24, until his death in 1982 as an AU Professor Emeritus. He was a muralist, painter, printmaker, draftsman, and professor at the Phillips Gallery School and then American University for over forty years.

Volkmar Kurt Wentzel (b. Dresden, 1915-2006) arrived in Washington, DC, in the early 1930s. When the Great Depression led to prohibitive housing costs in DC, he moved to Aurora, West Virginia, to join a community with Robert Gates and several other artists who had become close friends. In 1937, back in Washington, architect Erik Menke introduced Volkmar to a book titled Paris De Nuit (1933) by Brassaï, a French photographer. Volkmar was enchanted. He purchased a new camera and began photographing the series “Washington by Night.”

Landscape in an Eroded Field brings together three women artists whose work reflects the evolution of the pictorial landscape tradition in the Anthropocene era. Carol Barsha’s closely-observed nature studies and flowery landscapes are paired with Artemis Herber’s mythically-themed, architectonic reliefs. These immersive paintings surround a site-specific installation and soundscape designed by Heather Theresa Clark, utilizing her environmental planning background.

The title of this exhibition is borrowed from that of a book written in 1932 by Surrealist poet André Breton (1896-1966), who in turn had borrowed it from a scientific experiment of the same name.(…) The three artists in this exhibition all work from this premise, although with individual styles and imagery. While their work shows continuity with Surrealist ideas of the 1930s and 40s, it also relates to the Chicago Imagists of the 1960s and 70s, reflecting the prevalence of surrealist imagery in contemporary visual art.

Luis Lorenzana (b. 1979) is a self-taught Filipino artist whose background in politics has infused his work with a cynicism that belies his longing for a kinder, more equitable world. The exhibition thus touches on the themes of a desperate kind of selfless heroism—and the all-too familiar failure of a democratic political system. These are works that will have relevance to the current American landscape; indeed, to anywhere in the world.

Farid’s exhibition at Witte de With presents a newly commissioned film installation, along with her film At the Time of the Ebb, 2019.

For centuries, Ovid’s inventive and playfully written stories have been a source of inspiration to visual artists, composers and writers. Maria van Donkelaar (Rotterdam, 1947) rewrote 23 stories from the Metamorphoses into light-hearted flowing verses. Sylvia Weve (Utrecht, 1958) created expressive, surrealistic and humorous illustrations to accompany the stories. (…) The exhibition ‘Metamorphoses, 2000 years after Ovid’, contains eight stories and shows how Ovid’s universal themes carry through to the present and make his work relevant to this very day.

The Danish firm Cobe is currently one of the most renowned protagonists of a new generation of architects. Using innovative methods, the team led by Dan Stubbergaard explores diverse potentials of the urban and promotes them through remarkable projects. Cobe sees the city as an extended living room, in which private and public spaces can be connected in experimental ways – making liveability a central theme of their work. The exhibition Our Urban Living Room presents a selection of realized projects in Copenhagen from the past thirteen years, including the urban space Karen Blixens Plads, the residential highrise The Silo and the Frederiksvej Kindergarten.

The exhibition Architecture for Pigs presents solutions for a modern agricultural pork production that meet the new demands of today’s critical consumer. In 2016, the organisers of an architectural student competition (KTBL and Stiftung LV Münster) began their research for new perspectives on agricultural architecture, livestock and societal engagement with agriculture

Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson (b. 1967) is one of the most important artists working today, appearing in leading museums and exhibitions worldwide. He is developing a new installation exclusively for the Kunsthaus Zürich that will occupy the entirety of the Bührle gallery. The exhibition’s subject is the relationship between human beings and the other life-forms and species on Earth – a central theme in the Anthropocene.