From the summer of 2019 the Kunsthal Rotterdam will present the impressive retrospective exhibition ‘Joana Vasconcelos. I’m Your Mirror’, featuring the work of the famous Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos (1971). In an activist and feminist way, and with a profound respect for Portuguese culture and traditions, she gives reality her own personal twist. Vasconcelos is known for her sharp sense of proportions, masterly use of colour and unusual choice of materials, like household appliances, wall tiles, textiles, medicines, urinals, pans and plastic cutlery.

In Eliasson’s captivating installations you become aware of your senses, people around you and the world beyond. Some artworks introduce natural phenomena such as rainbows to the gallery space. Others use reflections and shadows to play with the way we perceive and interact with the world. Many works result from the artist’s research into complex geometry, motion patterns, and his interest in colour theory. All but one of the works have never been seen in the UK before. Within the exhibition will be an area which explores Eliasson’s deep engagement with society and the environment. Discover what an artist’s perspective can bring to issues of climate change, energy, migration as well as architecture. And once every other week you’ll be able to communicate with people from Eliasson’s 100-strong team in his Berlin studio via a live link. The kitchen team at Studio Olafur Eliasson will also create a special menu and programme of related events for Tate Modern’s Terrace Bar, based on the organic, vegetarian and locally sourced food served in his Berlin studio.

Stinking Dawn is a walk-in stage design that functions as a changing film setting. Monumental modular architecture sets the location for a film by Gelatin and Liam Gillick that will be shot in situ. Directed by Gillick and based on his script, Gelatin will play the leading roles in this experimental film that explores the limits of human tolerance in the face of oppression, political crises and excessive self-deception.

Over a 70-year career, Takis (Panayiotis Vassilakis, born 1925) has created some of the most innovative art of the 20th century. Takis’s work seeks out the essential poetry and beauty of the electromagnetic universe. He was one of the most original artistic voices in Europe from the 1960s and remains a pioneering figure today. This the largest exhibition of Takis’s work ever held in the UK, bringing together over 70 works. Throughout his career he has produced antennae-like sculptures he calls Signals, and musical devices using magnets, electricity and viewer participation to generate resonant and random sounds. Such inventions earned Takis the admiration of the international avant-garde, ranging from the American Beat poets to artists such as Marcel Duchamp.

The exhibition ‘A Journey to the Homeland’ by the South African photographer Katharine Cooper (1978, Grahamstown) presents a probing portrait of white Africans. Major political events, such as the collapse of Apartheid in South Africa in 1994 and the expulsion of white farmers from their houses in Zimbabwe in 2000, significantly changed the position of these Africans. Although many of them managed to secure a certain future for themselves after these changes, others were not so lucky. In 2013, Cooper returned for a journey through the countries of her childhood, South Africa and Zimbabwe. In a respectful way, she captured members of the white minority that she used to belong to herself.

France-Lise McGurn (born 1983) is a Glasgow-based artist who predominantly works with painting to create fluid works that spill from the canvas onto the gallery walls, floors and ceilings. In her work McGurn draws on a collected archive of found imagery to create figurative installations which express notions of sexuality, ecstasy, loss and consciousness. The new body of work presented in Sleepless explores the experience of living in a city as one that is intimate and inherently sexual. The exhibition title itself evokes key themes in McGurn’s work, including partying, dreams, longing, motherhood and nostalgic popular culture, recalling the 1993 romantic comedy Sleepless in Seattle. Working intuitively rather than through direct appropriation, McGurn uses swift brushstrokes and repeated marks to create loose associations about place and history, inviting viewers to conjure their own narratives.

To mark the 25th anniversary of the city partnership between Berlin and Beijing, the Gesellschaft für Deutsch-Chinesischen kulturellen Austausch (GeKA e.V., Society for German-Chinese Cultural Exchange) in cooperation with the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin is showing works by young artists from Berlin and Beijing at the Museum für Fotografie (Museum of Photography).

This major new retrospective will explore the development of Sherman’s work from the mid-1970s to the present day, and will feature around 150 works from international public and private collections, as well as new work never before displayed in a public gallery. Focusing on the artist’s manipulation of her own appearance and her deployment of material derived from a range of cultural sources, including film, advertising and fashion, the exhibition will explore the tension between façade and identity.

Sketches and studies in oils hold a special appeal due to their immediacy and often unorthodox subject matter and individuality. Mostly on a small scale, they originated as drafts for potential patrons, evolving during the course of the nineteenth century into works of art in their own right. The Belvedere is dedicating an IN-SIGHT exhibition to this unique art form.

Berlin-based artist Heike-Karin Föll (born 1967, DE) works on the materiality and mechanisms of drawing, painting, and writing. The exhibition speed at KW Institute for Contemporary Art is her first institutional solo show and presents an overview of various groups of work.