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The exhibition presents three of the circa twenty extant works by Jan van Eyck, offering a glimpse of the art produced during the reign of Duke Philipp the Good, when the Burgundian Low Countries witnessed a unique flowering of courtly and urban civilisation.

Since the mid-1990s Monica Bonvicini has been exploring political, social, and institutional situations and their impact on society, as well as on the conditions of artistic production. Her work is direct, merciless, political, and not without a dry sense of humor. In the process, she focuses on the relationship between architecture, gender roles, control mechanisms, and devices of power. Bonvicini has a multimedia approach, using drawing, sculpture, installation, video, and photography. For the Belvedere 21—originally the Austrian pavilion at the World’s Fair in Brussels in 1958—she has developed a site-specific and space-consuming installation that reacts radically to Karl Schwanzer’s architecture. As such, it reflects male-dominated power structures, which are expressed just as much in the constructed space as in art history, politics and language.

An artistic exploration by Jeremias Altmann and Andreas Tanzer.

Of all the art movements of the 1950s and 1960s, op art has hitherto received the least attention. Often it is denigrated as being too spectacular and superficial. This is a misconception—this art sharpens our awareness of the ambiguity of appearances and illustrates the impossibility of grasping “reality.” Under the title Vertigo, mumok presents a deceptive game of the senses, presenting a wide spectrum ranging from panel paintings, reliefs, and objects to installations and experiential spaces, to film and computer-generated art.

Weltmuseum Wien presents the most extensive exhibition of modern and contemporary art from Nepal to date. The works on display range from outstanding representatives of the 1950s through to today’s nascent scene of vibrant new artists. As well contributing to an effective resituating of the West’s status within an international context, these works also offer insights into how the local, the national and the global interplay.

Endless House is a work that perfectly typifies the art and theory of Friedrich Kiesler. Its most conspicuous feature is the fact that space is continuously in flow. The body of this unusual architectural model is somehow spherical and yet irregular. The floor, walls and ceilings seem to be made of endless loops. Kiesler made only two full models of Endless House, one of which is held in the New York Whitney Museum.

Porcelain is like a material memory that can endure for centuries. UIi Aigner uses this medium as a starting-point to transform loss into a material message about life and survival. Her monumental porcelain vessel is to be shown in the series Carlone Contemporary in which contemporary artworks are juxtaposed with the Baroque pictorial programme of the Carlone Hall.

The Weltmuseum Wien is showing the largest-ever exhibition showcasing modern and contemporary art from Nepal. The works on display range from outstanding representatives of the 1950s through to today’s nascent scene of vibrant new artists. As well contributing to an effective resituating of the West’s status within an international context, these works also offer insights into how the local, the national and the global interplay.

At the invitation of the Weltmuseum Wien, the MuKul, the (fictitious) Museum for Foreign and Familiar Cultures is presenting an exhibition of works by artist Lisl Ponger. Visitors are invited to take part in an exploratory journey that starts out from six large-scale, staged photographs in light boxes and a 2-channel installation with the title The Master Narrative und Don Durito which lasts a full museum day.

The Albertina houses one of Europe’s most important compilations of Modernist art in the form of the Batliner Collection. Its permanent display starts off with such artists of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism as Monet, Degas, Cézanne, Toulouse-Lautrec, and Gauguin. Further highlights include examples of German Expressionism, with the groups of Brücke and Der Blaue Reiter, and the art of New Objectivity, with works by Wacker, Sedlacek, and Hofer. An in-depth focus on Austrian art comprises works by Kokoschka and paintings by Egger-Lienz. The great diversity of the Russian avant-garde is represented by paintings by Goncharova, Malevich, and Chagall. The presentation is topped off by numerous chefs-d’oeuvre by Picasso, ranging from his early Cubist pictures and works from his mature period of the 1940s to superb prints that have not yet been exhibited and paintings from his experimental late period.

Gustav Klimt created the famous Beethoven Frieze for the XIVth exhibition of the Association of Visual Artists Vienna Secession, which was held between April 15 and June 27, 1902. Conceived as a tribute to the composer Ludwig van Beethoven, the presentation epitomized the Secessionists’ vision of an encompassing synthesis of the arts. Twenty-one artists worked together under the direction of Josef Hoffmann. At the center of the exhibition, in the main hall, stood Max Klinger’s Beethoven statue. In addition to Klimt’s Beethoven Frieze, the show featured wall paintings and decorations by Alfred Roller, Adolf Böhm, Ferdinand Andri and numerous other artists. The stated objective was to reunite the separate arts—architecture, painting, sculpture and music—under a common theme: the “work of art” was to emerge from the interplay of the design of the rooms and the wall paintings and sculptures. Klimt’s monumental wall cycle was located in the left-hand aisle, which visitors to the exhibition entered first. An opening in the wall offered a view of Max Klinger’s Beethoven statue, hinting at the intended synergy of architecture, painting (Klimt’s Beethoven Frieze) and sculpture (Klinger’s Beethoven). With nearly 60,000 visitors, the XIVth exhibition was one of the Secession’s greatest public successes. It also proved crucial to Klimt’s […]

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