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Gustave Caillebotte (1848–1894) was one of the central figures of French Impressionism, yet he is among those artists who remain to be discovered today. His fame was initially founded on his role as a patron, and only later did he gain full recognition as a painter.

The exhibition Fazit is the prelude to an artistic project of the same name by realities:united. As the big, centralised thermal power stations start closing down in Germany, their artistic potential is explored with a view to accompanying industrial, cultural and social change. The proposal: Power stations still in operation during this stage should be modified so that instead of only producing energy and pollutants, they emit signals into the air, visible from afar, to symbolise and inspire this transformation.

To mark the centenary of the founding of the Bauhaus, this exhibition opens up a dialogue between contemporary art and the photographic avant-garde of the 1930s. It juxtaposes works by artists such as László Moholy-Nagy, Lucia Moholy, Man Ray, Jan Tschichold, Hedda Walther, Florence Henri, Hans Robertson and Erich Consemüller with groups of works by Thomas Ruff, Dominique Teufen, Daniel T. Braun, Wolfgang Tillmans, Doug Fogelson, Max de Esteban, Viviane Sassen, Stephanie Seufert, Kris Scholz, Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs, Antje Hanebeck and Douglas Gordon.

Standing in front of a painting that opens up like a window onto another world, who wouldn’t imagine what it would be like to really step inside the world of the picture? After an intensive development process, the Alte Nationalgalerie’s new app allows visitors to get up close and personal with one of the key works of the collection and its history in a totally new way.

The exhibition ‘BEYOND’ features seven international artistic positions from the Olbricht Collection, who use their respective art forms to explore the subject of the afterlife. Each artist fills a separate space with art in their chosen media, ranging from painting, sculpture, video, installation to printmaking. Artists: Jonas Burgert, Jake & Dinos Chapman, George Condo, Nathalie Djurberg & Hans Berg, FORT, Kris Martin, and Francisco de Goya  

Portraits and self-portraits by the painter Lotte Laserstein put a face on modern society in the Weimar Republic. Alongside her exhibition here at the Berlinische Galerie, BG has chosen some other (self-)portraits by artists who were living and working in Berlin at the same time as Laserstein.

Berlin’s Lotte Laserstein (1898-1993) was one of the most sensitive portrait painters of the early Modernist period when tradition vied with innovation. By the time she was 30, she was a well-known and successful artist. Her career was brutally ended in 1933. Berlin’s public museum of modern art, photography and architecture will show 58 works – 48 paintings and 9 drawings – by Laserstein along with documents reflecting her professional heyday in Berlin and her exile in Sweden.

Jack’s Jacks, which was conceived in close cooperation with the artist, shows how Whitten, over a period of more than five decades, continually extended the boundaries of abstract painting. Beginning with early gestural paintings that were strongly influenced by Abstract Expressionism, the exhibition traces Whitten’s development as a painter through to his later experiments with structure and materiality that resulted in a unique tesserae style. The exhibition pays particular attention to paintings dedicated to historical events and prominent people.

With The Black Image Corporation, Theaster Gates has conceived a participatory exhibition which explores the fundamental legacy of Johnson Publishing Company archives. Featuring more than four million images, they have contributed to shape the aesthetic and cultural languages of African American identity. Central to the exhibition are the works of two photographers, Moneta Sleet Jr. and Isaac Sutton, who both worked for Johnson Publishing.

“Aural” is the Berlin premiere of a Ganzfeld by the world’s foremost light sculptor. The installation is part of the Ganzfeld Pieces series, in which Turrell creates liminal zones of experience.

Music and youth culture, commemoration and traditions, languages ​​and homeland – 22 impressions depict the everyday life of secular and religious, long-established and newly arrived Jews in Germany. Using the letters of the Hebrew alphabet, the exhibition explores keywords, concepts, and what is “Jewish” in Germany today. In the process, light is shed on very different aspects of the German-Jewish present and perceptions of norms are critically examined.

The Jewish Museum Berlin ist exhibiting res·o·nant – a walk-through light and sound installation by the Düsseldorf conceptual artist Mischa Kuball. Kuball created the installation specially for the new exhibition space on the lower ground floor of the Libeskind building.

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