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The Expressionist Emil Nolde (1867–1956) is arguably the most famous “degenerate artist”. No other artist had as many works confiscated, nor were their works as prominently displayed in the early venues of the ‘Degenerate Art’ exhibition of 1937/38. (…) The exhibition presents over 100 originals, some of which have not previously been shown, with references to Nolde’s writings and in the historical context of their creation, in order to reveal the multi-layered relationships between paintings, the artist’s self-presentation, his ostracism, and development of his legend.

To mark the 25th anniversary of the city partnership between Berlin and Beijing, the Gesellschaft für Deutsch-Chinesischen kulturellen Austausch (GeKA e.V., Society for German-Chinese Cultural Exchange) in cooperation with the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin is showing works by young artists from Berlin and Beijing at the Museum für Fotografie (Museum of Photography).

Twenty years ago in 1999, TASCHEN published its first monumental art book: Helmut Newton’s SUMO. (…) Ten years ago in 2009, the Helmut Newton Foundation staged an unusual yet compelling exhibition dedicated to this legendary publication: all 460 pages of the book hung framed on the wall, side by side, in three rows one above the other. Exhibition visitors were literally able to see everything at once. (…) Now, a decade later and 20 years after its creation, SUMO will once again be presented at the Helmut Newton Foundation. Newton’s SUMO exhibition is complemented by an expanded reprise of the “Three Boys from Pasadena”. Ten years ago, the works of three of Newton’s former assistants – Mark Arbeit, George Holz, and Just Loomis – were featured all together in one of the foundation’s exhibition rooms. For this new exhibition, each of these American photographers will have a dedicated space for his unique and multifaceted oeuvre.    

Berlin-based artist Heike-Karin Föll (born 1967, DE) works on the materiality and mechanisms of drawing, painting, and writing. The exhibition speed at KW Institute for Contemporary Art is her first institutional solo show and presents an overview of various groups of work.

Image Bank was founded in 1970 in Vancouver, Canada, by artists Michael Morris, Vincent Trasov and Gary Lee-Nova. A model for a utopian, alternative system of art distribution operating outside institutions like the museum and the market, Image Bank engaged in an international exchange of images and correspondence by mail. Among the artists participating in the ever-growing network of exchange were (besides Morris, Trasov, and Lee-Nova) Dana Atchley, Robert Cumming, Dick Higgins, Geoff Hendricks, Glenn Lewis, Eric Metcalfe, Kate Craig, Willoughby Sharp, General Idea and Ant Farm.

Bani Abidi is known for her distinctive approach to filmmaking, which derives from the dark absurdities of everyday life. They Died Laughing is an extensive presentation of Abidi’s works, bringing together moving image and print-based works that span two decades.

Gustave Caillebotte (1848–1894) was one of the central figures of French Impressionism, yet he is among those artists who remain to be discovered today. His fame was initially founded on his role as a patron, and only later did he gain full recognition as a painter.

To mark the centenary of the founding of the Bauhaus, this exhibition opens up a dialogue between contemporary art and the photographic avant-garde of the 1930s. It juxtaposes works by artists such as László Moholy-Nagy, Lucia Moholy, Man Ray, Jan Tschichold, Hedda Walther, Florence Henri, Hans Robertson and Erich Consemüller with groups of works by Thomas Ruff, Dominique Teufen, Daniel T. Braun, Wolfgang Tillmans, Doug Fogelson, Max de Esteban, Viviane Sassen, Stephanie Seufert, Kris Scholz, Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs, Antje Hanebeck and Douglas Gordon.

Jack’s Jacks, which was conceived in close cooperation with the artist, shows how Whitten, over a period of more than five decades, continually extended the boundaries of abstract painting. Beginning with early gestural paintings that were strongly influenced by Abstract Expressionism, the exhibition traces Whitten’s development as a painter through to his later experiments with structure and materiality that resulted in a unique tesserae style. The exhibition pays particular attention to paintings dedicated to historical events and prominent people.

“Aural” is the Berlin premiere of a Ganzfeld by the world’s foremost light sculptor. The installation is part of the Ganzfeld Pieces series, in which Turrell creates liminal zones of experience.

Music and youth culture, commemoration and traditions, languages ​​and homeland – 22 impressions depict the everyday life of secular and religious, long-established and newly arrived Jews in Germany. Using the letters of the Hebrew alphabet, the exhibition explores keywords, concepts, and what is “Jewish” in Germany today. In the process, light is shed on very different aspects of the German-Jewish present and perceptions of norms are critically examined.

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