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When Hilma af Klint began creating radically abstract paintings in 1906, they were like little that had been seen before: bold, colorful, and untethered from any recognizable references to the physical world. It was years before Vasily Kandinsky, Kazimir Malevich, Piet Mondrian, and others would take similar strides to rid their own artwork of representational content. Yet while many of her better-known contemporaries published manifestos and exhibited widely, af Klint kept her groundbreaking paintings largely private. She rarely exhibited them and, convinced the world was not yet ready to understand her work, stipulated that it not be shown for twenty years following her death. Ultimately, her work was all but unseen until 1986, and only over the subsequent three decades have her paintings and works on paper begun to receive serious attention. Af Klint was born in Stockholm in 1862 and went on to study at the city’s Royal Academy of Fine Arts, graduating with honors in 1887. She soon established herself as a respected painter in Stockholm, exhibiting deftly rendered figurative paintings and serving briefly as secretary of the Association of Swedish Women Artists. During these years she also became deeply involved in spiritualism and Theosophy. These modes of spiritual engagement were […]

“Screens Series: Gelare Khoshgozaran” continues the New Museum’s Screens Series, a platform for the presentation of new video works by emerging contemporary artists. In her videos, performances, and installations, artist and writer Gelare Khoshgozaran mines the effects of displacement and the unstable relationship between fact and fiction.

The New Museum will present the first US solo museum show of Aslı Çavuşoğlu (b. 1982, Istanbul, Turkey), featuring a new body of work realized for the exhibition. In her research-driven practice, Çavuşoğlu takes up questions of history and belief by examining objects, images, and cultural symbols that have endured over time. National identity and the mechanisms through which political projects are constructed are recurring concerns. Many of her works address narratives of the past and suppositions of the present through oral histories, archives, artifacts, and raw materials, such as those used for color pigments.

“MOTHA and Chris E. Vargas: Consciousness Razing—The Stonewall Re-Memorialization Project” will be the exhibition and residency presented through the Department of Education and Public Engagement’s Fall 2018 R&D Season: Generation.

The New Museum will present the first American survey of the work of British artist Sarah Lucas (b. 1962, London, UK).

The New Museum and The Store X present “Strange Days: Memories of the Future,” an exhibition of select video works shown at the New Museum during its ten years on the Bowery.

In his performances, figurative sculptures, and drawings, Dan Herschlein (b. 1989, Bayville, NY) stages psychological tableaux that evoke feelings of isolation, anxiety, and a fracturing of the self.

The New Museum presents the first US solo museum exhibition by Marguerite Humeau (b. 1986, Cholet, France), debuting a new installation of sculpture and sound.

“Blood In My Milk” is the title of a new film and sound installation by Marianna Simnett (b. 1986, Kingston-upon-Thames, United Kingdom) and the artist’s first institutional solo exhibition in the US.

Through some 160 works, this exhibition presents the artistic output of Marc Chagall, El Lissitzky, Kazimir Malevich, and others, exploring a little-known chapter in the history of modernity and the Russian avant-garde.

Eliza Douglas creates precariously balanced compositions that teeter between realism and abstraction, balletic grace and slapstick humor. These latest works, part of a series begun in 2016, are titled with lines from the poems of Dorothea Lasky. In each canvas, expertly rendered hands are connected by a network of outlandishly long, gesturally painted shirtsleeves. Douglas typically serves as the model for these body parts and clothing, creating an oblique form of self-portrait. Her slippery approach to depicting herself suggests that there is always a gap between how we envision ourselves and how we are perceived by others.

In gallery space devoted to the permanent collection, the Guggenheim is showcasing its rich holdings of the work of Constantin Brancusi (1876–1957).

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