Featuring over fifty works from public and private collections across the world, Gainsborough’s Family Album will provide a unique insight into the private life and motivations of Thomas Gainsborough (1727–88), one of Britain’s greatest artists. The exhibition includes a number of works that have never been on public display in the UK and will bring together for the first time all twelve surviving portraits of Thomas Gainsborough’s daughters. Gainsborough’s Family Album charts Gainsborough’s career from youth to maturity, telling the story of an eighteenth-century provincial artist’s rise to metropolitan fame and fortune. The exhibition will both offer a new perspective on Gainsborough the portraitist and challenge our thinking about his era and its relationship to our own.

Reflecting the anxieties of the Cold War, artists used new processes and materials to make work that was often uncompromising, immediate and brutal. One critic described it as a ‘Geometry of Fear’. This exhibition in the Duveen Galleries features younger artists including Lynn Chadwick, Elizabeth Frink and Eduardo Paolozzi alongside older artists such as Jacob Epstein and Henry Moore. It also shows how the approach taken by the young British artists can be measured against the work of international artists. This includes entries to a competition to design a monument to the ‘Unknown Political Prisoner’ in 1953.

Since the mid-twentieth century the latest, petroleum has been the key substance of modern society. The exponentiated mobility on land, water, and in the air would be inconceivable without gasoline, diesel, and kerosene. The broad range of substances and products that characterize the MODERN WAY OF LIFE—from acrylic and asphalt to detergents and toothbrushes—is based on petroleum as a basic substance. The material intervenes massively in the ecosystems of our earth and now finds its way into every organism via derivatives such as artificial fertilizers, pharmaceuticals, and microplastics. Nevertheless, the intimate connection of the fossil energy source with all practical areas and abstract basic principles of life is only gradually being discovered. For too long, economic and political turf wars have obscured the view of the power of petroleum.

Born in 1833, Burne-Jones rejected the industrial world of the Victorians, looking instead for inspiration from medieval art, religion, myths and legends. He made spectacular works depicting Arthurian knights, classical heroes and Biblical angels – working across painting, stained glass, embroidery, jewellery and more. With his friend William Morris he was a pioneer of the arts and crafts movement, which aimed to bring beautiful design to everyone. This exhibition – his first solo show at Tate since 1933 – charts Burne-Jones’s rise from an outsider with little formal art training to one of the most influential British artists of the late 19th century. With over 150 objects, it will bring together major works from across his career for the first time in generations. Highlights include some of his best loved works, such as his huge paintings telling the dreamlike fairytale of Sleeping Beauty, wall-filling tapestries and his remarkable drawings.

Liverpool Mountain will be Swiss-artist Ugo Rondinone’s first public artwork in the UK and the first of its kind in Europe. Inspired by naturally occurring Hoodoos (spires or pyramids of rock) and the art of meditative rock balancing, this 10-metre high sculpture will stand within Mermaid Courtyard, outside Tate Liverpool on the Albert Dock. It will consist of coloured rocks, stacked vertically which seem to defy gravity. This outdoor sculpture marks the 10th anniversary of Liverpool European Capital of Culture, the 20th anniversary of Liverpool Biennial and the 30th anniversary of Tate Liverpool. Commissioned by Liverpool Biennial and Tate Liverpool as part of the Liverpool 2018 events programme with support from Royal Albert Dock Liverpool.

To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Fotomuseum Winterthur, we have invited friends and colleagues who have accompanied us along the way to choose their favourite works from our collection, which has been a mainstay of our activities ever since the museum was founded in 1993. Director Nadine Wietlisbach, by adding further works to this selection, affords a glimpse of our future path. Come and join us on a journey through the history of the museum and the stories it tells. The exhibition and the accompanying publication, which includes numerous interviews and essays as well as a portrait series by Anne Morgenstern (designed by Hi, Megi Zumstein and Claudio Barandun and to be published by Spector Books in November), both are under the banner of our shared memories and our anticipation of adventures still to come.

This exhibition combines films made by Rosalind Nashashibi and Lucy Skaer with their personal selection of historic and contemporary art that reflects on and adds new meaning to their work. Using 16mm film, Nashashibi/Skaer’s collaborative projects often evolve from the art and artists that inspire them. For the first time, the full extent of their practice is shown alongside significant works by artists including Paul Gauguin, Henri Matisse, Paul Nash, Winifred Nicholson, Lee Miller and Rossella Biscotti. Each of their films becomes a starting point to explore key themes that resonate across the exhibition, from the changing portrayal of women and the representation of global cultures, to issues around conflict.

The exhibition ON AIR is an ecosystem in becoming, hosting emergent choreographies and polyphonies across human and non-human universes, where artworks reveal the common, fragile and ephemeral rhythms and trajectories between these worlds. As a hybrid ecosystem, ON AIR is made of a myriad presences, both animate and inanimate, that meet and cohabit within it. Some voices become quiet, whilst others, perhaps those less often heard by human ears, are magnified. The exhibition functions as an ensemble for silent voices, performing the hidden scores that link events and sensibilities, earthly and cosmic phenomena – weaving a web of relations that cannot be described but maybe can be felt.   ON AIR proposes a space and time that makes manifest the forces and entities that float in the air, and their interactions with us: from CO2 to cosmic dust, from radio infrastructures to reimagined corridors of mobility. Thus, the invisible histories that compose the ecologies we are part of invite us to poetically rethink different ways of inhabiting the world – and of being human.   While extractivist activities that mine the Earth for resources continue to threaten entire ecologies, ON AIR celebrates new ways of thinking about our relation with […]

Growing up in Colombia in the 1940s and 50s, during an era of political unrest known as La Violencia (The Violence), González became a pivotal figure in the Latin-American art scene. The exhibition features 60 years of González’ internationally acknowledged work and displays a selection of 120 works created between 1965 and 2017.

In the fall of 2018, Werner Feiersinger will stage a sculptural intervention at the lower level of the Belvedere 21. The Austrian sculptor is proficient at combining knowledge of design and architectural history with minimalist form language. The proximity of his sculptures with everyday objects and their metaphorical quality subvert their purported origins. 

When Hilma af Klint began creating radically abstract paintings in 1906, they were like little that had been seen before: bold, colorful, and untethered from any recognizable references to the physical world. It was years before Vasily Kandinsky, Kazimir Malevich, Piet Mondrian, and others would take similar strides to rid their own artwork of representational content. Yet while many of her better-known contemporaries published manifestos and exhibited widely, af Klint kept her groundbreaking paintings largely private. She rarely exhibited them and, convinced the world was not yet ready to understand her work, stipulated that it not be shown for twenty years following her death. Ultimately, her work was all but unseen until 1986, and only over the subsequent three decades have her paintings and works on paper begun to receive serious attention. Af Klint was born in Stockholm in 1862 and went on to study at the city’s Royal Academy of Fine Arts, graduating with honors in 1887. She soon established herself as a respected painter in Stockholm, exhibiting deftly rendered figurative paintings and serving briefly as secretary of the Association of Swedish Women Artists. During these years she also became deeply involved in spiritualism and Theosophy. These modes of spiritual engagement were […]